2008 INTREPID 323 Cuddy

2008 INTREPID 323 Cuddy For Sale
$139,900 | Saint Petersburg Florida, United States
Summary

 

The Intrepid 323 Cuddy is a premium day boat designed mostly for cruising, but versatile enough to be set up for fishing as well. Like all late-model Intrepid products, the 323 rides on a single-step deep-V hull known for its soft ride and agile handling characteristics.

There are several innovative features on this boat, beginning with a pop-up console electronics display and Intrepid’s signature lounge seating forward of the console. A transom door and insulated port fish box are standard in the cockpit, and small dive platforms flank the outboard engines.

Forward is a flush cuddy cabin with a V-berth, hanging locker, and a space-saving head that swivels out from under the step at the touch of a button. (A galley cabinet was optional.

Standard features include cabin carpet, trim tabs, and a thru-bow anchor chute. It’s important to note that Intrepids are semicustom boats, and just about everything in the way of equipment was optional.

The 323’s stepped hull is vacuum-bagged and fully cored. A popular model, twin 300hp Mercury Verado outboards.

Dimensions
  • LENGTH32' (9.75m)
  • DRAFT2' 6" (0.76m)
  • BEAM 9' 6" (2.90m)
  • MFG LENGTH32' (9.75m)
Accomodations
  • SLEEPS 2
  • STATEROOMS1
Speed / Weight
  • DISPLACEMENT9000 Lbs
  • FUEL CAPACITY 208 Gallons 787.37 Liters
  • WATER CAPACITY30 Gallons 113.56 Liters
  • HOLDING TANK15 Gallons 56.78 Liters
Hull Information
  • HULL IDIBW3X206B808
  • HULL MATERIALFiberglass
Engine 1 Information
  • MANUFACTURERMercury
  • ENGINE TYPEOutboard
  • MODELVerado
  • FUEL TYPEGas/Petrol
  • ENGINE HOURS750
  • HORSEPOWER300
Engine 2 Information
  • MANUFACTURERMercury
  • ENGINE TYPEOutboard
  • MODELVerado
  • FUEL TYPEGas/Petrol
  • ENGINE HOURS450
  • HORSEPOWER300
Details

Like all Intrepids, the 323 runs on a single-step, deep-V hull. Unlike other stepped-hull boats that target a higher top end, the 323 is designed to provide increased efficiency without requiring special driving techniques. It also provides no-brainer handling and extends cruising range. Its step isn't too large, ensuring plenty of contact between hull and water-and in the right place along the hull. Even aggressive, lock-to-lock turns resulted in smooth, leaning curves. For moderate speeds, say to tour some waterfront houses, you can run the 323 under 20 mph without the bow pointing skyward. These are attributes I haven't found in other stepped-hull boats, most of which are fast but fickle. Who wants to memorize trim positions at various rpm to make a controlled turn?

Ride quality is stellar. Test day's 25-mph winds allowed me to prove it. In addition to the step, which is positioned so that the proper angle of attack is built-in, the convex forward sections of the 323's hull keep the bow from stuffing into waves. At 37 mph, the 323 lifts easily to oncoming swells and then, instead of launching, simply punches off the tops of them. Soft reentry is attained and assured not only by the 21 1/2-degree deadrise angle at the transom, but by the increasingly higher degree of deadrise measured on the forward hull panel.

There's room for six on two lounges, each of which sports stowage within. An L-shaped lounge abuts the front of the side console helm. Its backrest opens, revealing batteries, rigging, and electronics.

At the wheel, push a button and raise the electronics pod. It's huge, big enough for two mega-screen displays. And instead of cheaply ringing a gasket around the cutout from which this console pops, Intrepid applied some nifty mold work to keep out the water:

Weather protection for the 323's accessory switches is ensured because they are mounted on a flip-out panel. A 6"-diameter compass pad is molded on centerline. The leaning post travels electrically through 15" for easy adjustment. It also features drinkholders, rocket launchers, and a waist-high grabrail for companions standing behind you. Like the top, the leaning post's metal work is powder coated to match the deck gel coat. It's a skipper's helm station, through and through.

Terminals are shrink sealed and then coated with liquid vinyl for double protection. You also won't fuss with the optional canvas top. Instead of laces, which need tightening periodically, the top's cover is stretched over its frame and secured with a trim ring. It's tight as a drum; there are no gaps and it looks great.

Twin 300 Verado

HD Lower Units

Port Engine 750 Hours

Starboard Engine 450 Hours

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